Xbox Boss Phil Spencer has said that it’s okay if families don’t go out and purchase a new Xbox Series X console this holiday due to the financial circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic.

Speaking to the BBC, the Xbox boss explained that Microsoft will continue to support the current generation of Xbox to help gamers transition into next-gen without feeling that their recent purchases were for nothing.

Spencer claims that their method of delivering the next-generation of Xbox gaming is about giving players more choice, including allowing gamers to purchase their Xbox Series X through the Xbox All Access subscription service.

“So we want to be really tuned in to that as we launch. How can we make it as affordable as possible? How can we give buyers choice?” Spencer told the BBC.

“We’ve got an Xbox All Access subscription programme that allows people to buy their next console by paying a monthly charge. And if now is not the time for you to buy a new console, and you’re going to stay with the console you have, we’re going to keep supporting that console.”

Phil Spencer continues to explain that with the rise of the Xbox Game Pass subscription service, the company isn’t too focused on how many units they sell.

“If this is not the year when a family wants to make a decision to buy a new Xbox, that’s OK,” he said.

“Our strategy does not revolve around how many Xboxes I sell this year. We’re focused on delivering services through Xbox Game Pass, which allows people to build their library for a monthly fee,” the Xbox Boss said.  “Backward compatibility means that the console that they have will play thousands and thousands of games. Smart delivery means when they move to the next generation, the games will move with them.”

Despite the economic recession that is starting to rear its ugly head, the Xbox boss believes that gaming will continue to thrive.

“People find real value in the investment that they make in gaming. You can buy a console, buy some games, and it can literally provide your family with hundreds of hours of entertainment,” said Spencer. “Even when we went back and looked at 2008-09, in that recession, to see what the impact was on gaming – gaming did OK. It was durable.”

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