Tesla has announced another record quarter, shipping a total of 97,000 cars in Q3 2019.

Tesla produced 96,155 vehicles and delivered 97,000 vehicles, falling ever so slightly short of their 100,000 goal, but up from their last record quarter in Q2 2019 of 87,048 vehicles produced and 95,200 delivered.

Tesla had been pushing to ship 100,000 units, and came close, but the company remains constrained by logistics, though the new Gigafactory 3 set to open in October in China should open up further capacity.

Tesla said despite record deliveries, they entered the new quarter with an order backlog, and hoped to deliver 110,000 cars in Q4 2019.

See Tesla’s full press release below:

Tesla Q3 2019 Vehicle Production & Deliveries

PALO ALTO, Calif., October 2, 2019 – In the third quarter, we achieved record production of 96,155 vehicles and record deliveries of approximately 97,000 vehicles.

Production Deliveries Subject to lease accounting
Model S/X 16,318 17,400 15%
Model 3 79,837 79,600 8%
Total 96,155 97,000

In addition, we achieved record net orders in Q3 and are entering Q4 with an increase in our order backlog. As was also the case in Q2, nearly all of our Model 3 orders were received from customers who did not previously hold a reservation, solidifying the transition to generating strong organic demand. We are continuing to focus on increasing production to meet that demand.

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Our net income and cash flow results will be announced along with the rest of our financial performance when we announce Q3 earnings. Our delivery count should be viewed as slightly conservative, as we only count a car as delivered if it is transferred to the customer and all paperwork is correct. Final numbers could vary by up to 0.5% or more. Tesla vehicle deliveries represent only one measure of the company’s financial performance and should not be relied on as an indicator of quarterly financial results, which depend on a variety of factors, including the cost of sales, foreign exchange movements and mix of directly leased vehicles.

Via Electrek

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