Reuters reports that the European Union is set to make another attempt to force Apple to switch to a common charging standard shared by other smartphone OEMs.

Android smartphone OEMs have settled on USB-C, but Apple has resisted pressure to abandon the Lightning port on the iPhones, despite switching to USB-C on their laptops and some iPads.

Reuters reports that the European Commission is set to present new legislation to establish a common charging standard for mobile phones and other electronics sold in the EU.

The legislation is currently being drafted, according to their sources.  The European Parliament has already voted overwhelmingly in favour of a common charger for environmental reasons and for the convenience of users.

Apple has resisted the idea, saying that the issue can be solved by supplying a USB-C to Lightning cable, allowing common chargers to be used, despite having different ports on phones. iPhones currently ship with only a USB-C to Lightning cable and no charging brick.

Paradoxically Apple said a switch to USB-C on the iPhone would create a mountain of electronic waste, but presumable iPhone users would simply need a cheap USB-C to USB-C cable.

Apple also says it would hurt innovation, which in Apple’s case likely means the release of a completely portless iPhone which relies only on MagSafe charging.

Apple has scuppered previous voluntary plans to converge on a common standard, and given this history, it seems likely this year’s legislation will have a lot more teeth.

Do our readers agree this move is long overdue? Let us know below.

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