Many of us have had the displeasure of parking in the wrong place, at the wrong time; and coming back to our vehicle to find a nasty surprise.

Tesla’s integrated surveillance system has helped many owners bring vandals to justice.  In Sentry mode, autopilot cameras are activated when motion is detected in the close vicinity.  The footage is then stored for future reference, where it can be used as incriminating evidence.

High-quality, close-up recordings make it much more likely to identify the criminal in question than referring to CCTV-footage alone.

Following the random vandalism of his Model 3, owner Godwin Leung consulted Sentry Mode, and found the following footage:

A few things still made it really difficult to pinpoint actual suspects.  Alberta -where the incident took place- doesn’t require front license plates, so the car could not be identified.  Additionally, the perpetrator came equipped with sunglasses.

Thankfully, after the surveillance footage was uploaded online, the culprit came forward as 20-year-old Austin Grabas.

Grabas claimed it wasn’t a personal attack against Leung, nor Tesla, and he just thought that the Tesla “cut him off”.

He admits “it was a stupid, stupid mistake”, and is covering the $1,600 worth of damage that he’s caused.

This is by far an isolated attack- several similar incidents have been reported this month alone; all of which have ended with the criminals turning themselves in.

Not too long ago, Dannie Chang from South Surrey, British Colombia, had his Model 3 targeted.

With the recent increase in the prevalence of attacks against Tesla, it makes you wonder whether the criminals actually have an ulterior motive.  Now that public awareness of Sentry Mode has increased, hooligans may want to think twice before committing such mindless acts of crime.

Source: electrek

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