Late last year, Microsoft decided to move Edge away from its own native Edge HTML engine to a more mainstream Chromium Engine. The benefits of this included more widespread support for the browser and more crucially, faster updates. This is because the Chromium powered Edge was decoupled from the normal Windows update cadence, allowing it to be updated independently of Windows itself.

A study by security firm Duo found that ‘classic’ Edge was often falling behind in terms of updates, with many users on older versions of the browser.

“Understanding the browsers user devices are running — and granting or denying access based on whether these browsers are current or out of date — is critical. At the time of data collection, we found that Edge is the most frequently out-of-date browser on end user devices, while Internet Explorer was the most frequently up to date.” The report said. “When compared to 2018’s data, Edge rose to the No. 1 most frequently out-of-date browser from fifth place. That is likely due to Edge being coupled with Windows 10 and enterprises struggling to run the latest and greatest version.”

With Chromium Edge, users won’t have to install a whole new operating system to get the most secure version of their browser. Perhaps in an ideal world, all users would be on the latest version of Windows, all the time. This isn’t that ideal world, and Microsoft’s move to Chromium Edge ends up looking like a smarter idea every day.

Source: Duo, Via: Windows Report

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