Microsoft planning RIM-like NOC service

Microsoft also getting into the NOC business? I thought with Windows Phone 7 now public we now no longer need to keep an eye on Microsoft’s job postings, but BNET has discovered there is still some goodies out there.

The job posting below describe a “real-time, highly-available and scalable, network service” to “significantly enhance the phone user’s browsing, email and social networking experience” while “reducing the bandwidth and spectrum usage by the applications running on the device by proxying all the data traffic through our service and deploying various techniques around compression, redundancy elimination, adaptive streaming and traffic shaping.”

Knowledgeable readers will describe the system as pretty much the same as the one run by RIM, who famously uses a 1/3 of the data of the iPhone for the same features.

See the full posting below.

Product: Windows Phone
Division: Entertainment & Devices Division

Online services that improve the phone user’s experience and optimize the mobile operator’s resources is an area of huge investment in the mobile computing industry as well as within Microsoft.
The Windows Phone Services org’s Network Services group is in the planning stages for building a real-time, highly-available and scalable, network service in the cloud to significantly enhance the phone user’s browsing, email and social networking experience. One of the main goals of this service is to reduce the bandwidth and spectrum usage by the applications running on the device by proxying all the data traffic through our service and deploying various techniques around compression, redundancy elimination, adaptive streaming and traffic shaping.

If you enjoy tough technical challenges and like building products from ground up, this is the place for you. This is an opportunity to join a team that is about to create a brand new online service offering Microsoft’s phone users. This is a key part of a sustained push to not only further delight Windows Phone Series 7 users, but to also put these enthusiastically well-received phones at a strong competitive advantage for both Microsoft and the mobile operators.

In this position, you will be partnering closely with a handful of very senior technical architects and subject matter experts. You will be responsible for managing a team of strong developers and tasked with delivering a service that optimizes the radio network resources by taking a complete end-to-end view of problem space.

Would our readers enjoy having their smartphones tied even closer to Microsoft’s services, if it meant they could get a cheaper data plan? Let us know below.

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