If you use your Surface as a notepad, you’ll know that any delay in “ink” output totally throws off the precision of your markings.  Despite all the benefits of paperless note-taking, it’s undeniable that it’s much harder to produce a legible document using an electronic pen.

After introducing the Surface Studio, it became pertinent for Microsoft to resolve the latency issues with the Surface Pen.  The company has since mentioned a software-based solution that can be used to display the virtual ink faster.

The system works by familiarising itself with the way the user writes, so it can predict the user’s desired outcome:

A facility for adapting the prediction of ink is described. In some examples, the facility receives information about a spatial movement by a user. The spatial movement is generated by the user, and generates an ink stroke that reflects the spatial movement described by the received information and at least a portion of the predicted future spatial movement.

One way of adjusting the prediction for the representation of the ink is described. In some examples, the device receives information about a user’s spatial movement. Based on the received information, the device predicts future spatial movement by the user and generates an ink stroke that reflects both the spatial motion described by the received information and at least a portion of the predicted future spatial motion.

If successful, this software could ultimately facilitate society’s transition from paper-based to more futuristic, sustainable storage solutions.  Until then, it’ll help you to keep notes that are actually neat enough to read once over.

Via WindowsUnited

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