AI Music logo
AI Music uses a technology that generates a song out of royalty-free music.

Apple just completely acquired a London-based music business called AI Music. It is a startup business founded in 2016 offering a service that “helps brands enable deeper connections with their audiences.” Via AI, the tech developed by the company can customize the music individuals are hearing based on their interactions, time, and other conditions. Hence, this AI’s algorithm will make new variations of songs to present you with different music every time. 

According to AI Music on its now-defunct website, it creates soundtracks using the combination of artificial intelligence power and royalty-free music. With this, the music will dynamically change based on the person’s experiences and activities, allowing you “to redefine how we create, interact and experience music.” This is the same concept that helped the startup seize some previous deals with other advertising companies aiming to produce bespoke audios for various audiences and groups.

LinkedIn Page of AI Music
LinkedIn Page of AI Music

Moreover, AI Music says on its LinkedIn page that it “allows brands, developers and sonic adventurers access to our intelligent music library” and hopes “give consumers the power to choose the music they want, seamlessly edited to fit their needs or create dynamic solutions that adapt to fit their audiences.”

With all of this, AI Music is undoubtedly one of the secret weapons Apple plans to use to boost its audio offerings and services. Due to its capabilities, it promises promising innovation in the future of Apple products and services such as Apple Music, HomePod mini, and Apple Fitness+.

According to experts, Apple will most likely use the new technology to give its users a better and more mood-matching music experience. For instance, AI Music can come in handy in tailoring your music when working out and using Apple Music.

“It’s that idea of contextual AI. Maybe you listen to a song and in the morning, it might be a little bit more of an acoustic version. Maybe that same song when you play it as you’re about to go to the gym, it’s a deep-house or drum’n’bass version. And in the evening, it’s a bit jazzier. The song can actually shift itself. The entire genre can change, or the key it’s played in,” expressed Siavash Mahdavi, the company’s chief executive officer, in a Music Ally interview.

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