As online support for Rocket League on macOS and Linux is officially being pulled in March, players on those platforms can request a refund through Steam if they no longer wish to play the game.

Regardless of whether you’ve owned the game for more than 2 weeks or have more than 2 hours of playtime logged, you can still request a refund. There are two ways to go about it.

The first way is to request an automated refund, which you can do by following the steps below:

  1. Head to the Steam Support website and log in to your Steam account.
  2. Go to “Purchases”
  3. Select “Rocket League”
    • Note: You may need to select “View complete purchasing history” at the bottom of your Purchases page if Rocket League isn’t showing up.
  4. Select “I would like a refund”
  5. Choose “I’d like to request a refund”
  6. Select “My issue isn’t listed” from the Reason dropdown menu
  7. In the notes, write “Please refund my Mac/Linux version of Rocket League, Psyonix will be discontinuing support.”

You should receive a reply about the status of the refund shortly after you’ve completed the form. If your request is rejected or if you’re having any other troubles, you can also submit a manual ticket that will be personally reviewed by a Valve Support Agent.

In order to submit a manual ticket, follow the steps below:

  1. Head over to the Steam Support website and log in to your Steam account.
  2. Go to “Purchases”
  3. Select “Rocket League”
    • Note: As mentioned above, you may need to select “View complete purchasing history” at the bottom of your Purchases page if Rocket League isn’t showing up.
  4. Select “I have a question about this purchase”
  5. In the text field, ensure you mention the following:
    • That you would like a refund on Rocket League.
    • That you play on macOS or Linux.
    • That Psyonix will be discontinuing support for the macOS and Linux versions of the game soon.
  6. Wait for the Valve support agent to respond to your ticket.

If that doesn’t work, your next best bet would be submitting a help ticket directly to Psyonix and asking for their help on the issue. You can do that by going to this page here and clicking “Submit a ticket” at the top of the page.

Just note that if you request a refund and it’s accepted, Rocket League will be removed from your account. You can’t request a refund and continue playing the non-online version of the game when the update hits in March.

Psyonix hasn’t said how long refunds will be offered for, though, so if you’re looking for your money back, it’d be best to not leave it until the last minute. The company also didn’t mention what would happen in regards to items and keys purchased by players.

However, Psyonix has now clarified just why support for macOS and Linux is being pulled, posting the following statement on Reddit:

Rocket League is an evolving game, and part of that evolution is keeping our game client up to date with modern features. As part of that evolution, we’ll be updating our Windows version from 32-bit to 64-bit later this year, as well as updating to DirectX 11 from DirectX 9.

There are multiple reasons for this change, but the primary one is that there are new types of content and features we’d like to develop, but cannot support on DirectX 9. This means when we fully release DX11 on Windows, we’ll no longer support DX9 as it will be incompatible with future content.

Unfortunately, our macOS and Linux native clients depend on our DX9 implementation for their OpenGL renderer to function. When we stop supporting DX9, those clients stop working. To keep these versions functional, we would need to invest significant additional time and resources in a replacement rendering pipeline such as Metal on macOS or Vulkan/OpenGL4 on Linux. We’d also need to invest perpetual support to ensure new content and releases work as intended on those replacement pipelines.

The number of active players on macOS and Linux combined represents less than 0.3% of our active player base. Given that, we cannot justify the additional and ongoing investment in developing native clients for those platforms, especially when viable workarounds exist like Bootcamp or Wine to keep those users playing.

If you’re on macOS or Linux and you’re fine with the lack of online functionality coming in March 2020, then all you need to do is just keep playing Rocket League as normal.

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