Kaspersky takes the Spotify route, taking Apple to Federal Antimonpoly Service

Kaspersky is the recent victim of Apple’s controversial Store policy. The cybersecurity, therefore, has filed an antitrust complaint against Apple. Spotify recently performed a similar stunt.

Kaspersky’s decision comes days after the iPhone maker removed Kaspersky Safe kids app from App store citing reasons that it did not meet App Store guidelines. And according to Apple, it’s the use of ‘configuration profiles’ inside the app that led them removing the app from its App Store.

Kaspersky on the other side explained that removing ‘configuration profiles’ would have serious consequences for users as it provides two key functions. One, the feature enables parents to monitor their kids’ apps activity. And the other benefit of having ‘configuration profiles’ is that it can hide all browsers on the device and this forces all the web pages to open in the Kaspersky Safe Kids app’s built-in secure browser.

Kaspersky hopes that its complaint┬áto the Russian Federal Antimonopoly Service against Apple will have a positive impact on the industry and will benefit the third-party developers at large. You can read an excerpt of Kaspersky’s argument below.

From our point of view, Apple appears to be using its position as platform owner and supervisor of the sole channel for delivering apps to users of the platform to dictate terms and prevent other developers from operating on equal terms with it. As a result of the new rules, developers of parental control apps may lose some of their users and experience financial impact. Most important, however, it is the users who will suffer as they miss out on some critical security features. The market for parental control apps will head toward a monopoly and, consequently, stagnation.

Via: Macrumors

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