With both Sony’s PlayStation 5 and Microsoft’s Xbox Scarlett both announced and in development, Xbox is already pushing a lofty goal: having games play¬†best on its next-gen console.

In an interview with Windows Central, numerous Xbox spokespersons expressed their goal of making the best console they possibly can. After the conceived failures of the original Xbox One, which still provides problems for multi-platform titles today, Microsoft appears to have learned their lesson.

Windows Central’s Jez Corden talked to both Corporate Vice President Mike Ybarra and Partner Director of Program Management Jason Roland about the future of Xbox.

According to Corden, Xbox Scarlett is being designed around removing as many bottlenecks as they can for the next-generation. With Xbox One X already rocking a 6 Teraflop GPU, the obvious bottleneck is within the CPU. With Navi and Zen 2 both in place, with the rumoured GPU stretching above Google Stadia’s 10.7 teraflop CPU, Microsoft is allegedly creating a monster. “It eats monsters for breakfast,” says the trailer.

“As we look across the entire design of the system everything from the SOC (system-on-chip), to the memory that we have to the SSD that we’ve put in there. It’s really about eliminating all those bottlenecks, so those game developers can really deliver on their visions, to try and enable developers to make the best possible versions of their games,” said Mike Ybarra. “I will say that we’re very confident in what we’re building, something that will set a new bar for expectations of console gaming.”

According to Corden, the Xbox team being able to say that Xbox is “where games play best” is an important goal.

Microsoft clearly learned their lesson with Xbox One X. No dependency on Kinect, focus clearly on the games, and create the best hardware you can. As much as people want to believe that Xbox is a popular brand in comparison to its contemporaries, some gamers have been shafted by corporate decisions in the past. Xbox One X was a good first step; Xbox Scarlett is the company’s redemption.

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