Windows 10X is meant to bring new way to run Windows, one which is secure by default, and where updates would happen transparently, almost without users noticing.

At the same time, the operating system is meant to provide a wide range of compatability with existing Windows software. We have long suspected Microsoft plans to achieve this via virtual machine container technology, and now a job post on LinkedIn confirmed the rumours. It states:

The Azure Core OS Kernel team is seeking an experienced development lead to manage the Containers team.? The Containers team collaborates with teammates throughout Windows to design, develop, and enable new scenarios that leverage containers for improved security, isolation and compatibility.? These technologies form the basis for Store-delivered Win32 applications, Windows Server Containers, Windows Defender Application Guard, Windows Sandbox, and Win32 application support for Windows 10X on dual-screen devices like Surface Neo.

What is particularly interesting of course is that Microsoft is planning to use the same technology on the desktop as the server, which is likely to guarantee security, but not necessarily performance on desktop processors. Windows Defender Application Gaurd, for example, demands 8 GB of RAM and not all apps may be compatible.

We expect Windows 10X to hit the market some time in the middle of 2020 with the arrival of dual-screen Windows 10 devices when we should be able to discover if containers on Windows 10x work as well in practice.

Via WindowsLatest

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