When technology breaks barriers

kinect_joyride

They wildly flail their arms, they jump around, they make valiant attempts to follow a dancer on the screen to no avail. They do all these while looking stupid but still have smiles on their faces because its so much fun. Playing games without having to memorize which buttons to press. Lets not also forget the fail videos appearing on YouTube featuring injuries experienced during gameplay.

Then, there is a heartwarming story by gamingnexus.com editor, John Yan, chronicling his experience playing games using the Kinect sensor with his son for the first time. You see, his son was diagnosed with Autism a few years ago so that means he needs a little bit more help with some things. Some excerpts from the article

So, when my son really wanted to try out Kinect, I was more than happy to oblige. He’s taken up to watching me play a lot of video games and tries to play some himself. Controllers for the PlayStation 3, Wii, and Xbox 360 do frustrate him and he has a lot of trouble controlling the characters on the screen using the peripherals, but he’s always willing to try and keep on practicing in getting better. As he tells me sometimes, “I want to play with you, Daddy.” so he’s pretty persistent in trying to get proficient with them.

What proceeded to happen was pretty amazing to me. Firing up Kinect Adventures, we tried out Rally Ball as our first game to play together. He jumped around and flailed his arms and legs in trying to punch the balls back to the blocks. It was pretty cool to see but the thing that really threw me for a loop was when the game ended. The game made my son the primary controller and seeing as I didn’t explain anything to him on how it works, I was ready to tell him to step out so I can go in and navigate through the menus…

Please read the rest of the article to see how a simple piece of technology was able to bring a father and son together. I promise you will not be disappointed.

Via @majornelson

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