Microsoft Is Ready To Even Share Thier Internal Design Docs And Code Regarding Pointer Events To Google

Pointer events is a new standard which Microsoft initiated at first and later developed by the W3C to define a unified device input model – pen, mouse and touch – across multiple browsers. Pointer Events makes it easier to support a variety of browsers and devices by saving Web developers from writing unique code for each input type. To demonstrate cross browser interoperability for Pointer Events, Microsoft contributed patches to Blink and Mozilla browser engines, and developed interoperability prototypes, including a Pointer Events prototype for WebKit. Also, Pointer Events was well received by the web community. Few weeks back, Chrome team posted that they are planning to drop Pointer Events support in Chrome citing some lame reasons. Read about it here.

There is a huge discussion going on regarding this removal of support from Chrome. In response to Google engineer’s argument, Microsoft’s engineer posted the below statement. He reaffirmed that to help make this happen for web developers in an open and interoperable way, Microsoft is even ready share internal design docs, architecture diagrams, testing methodologies, and even code.

This argument can be applied to a lot of (if not most) new standards. Again, I use the comparison with CSS layout standards. I can’t imagine we’d be in a better place if we had provided attributes on table elements that allowed them to have the functionality of flexbox and grid. Developers are willing to make the move to a better API–the very existence of polyfills demonstrates this acceptance. I think if the web developer burden you suggest is real, then we wouldn’t see comments like those we’ve seen this last couple weeks on CRBug, Reddit, HN, etc. [1] nor would there be 28k + hits for “pointerdown” in JS code on GitHub.  Furthermore, it’s not every day that two of the most influential open source web framework foundations requests a 2 hour phone call with browser vendors (as in the start of this thread), let alone decide to take a hard dependency on an API at this stage in interoperability. I’ve really seen nothing but evidence that web developers want pointer events and are willing to make the switch now or at least once other browsers also support it.

So we want to help make this happen for web developers in an open and interoperable way. To that end, consider this an open invitation for the Chrome, Mozilla, Opera, or Safari teams to come up to Redmond and work with us further on any remaining technical issues (or we’ll come to you if that’s easier). If it helps, we’re happy to share internal design docs, architecture diagrams, testing methodologies, and even our code (seriously!).

-Jacob

Source: w3.org

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